First-Grader Girls 7 Year without hands award for penmanship

Annie Clark
Annie Clark, in the last 7 years, was born without arms, but in a spirit of can do, has won national awards for writing beautiful.

The first grader students at Wilson Christian Academy in the Pittsburgh area was awarded the Nicholas Maxim Special mounting surprise Good handwriting in school on Wednesday, where he presented with trophies and prizes of $ 1,000 from Zaner-Bloser, a publisher textbook which sponsored the contest.
After receiving the award, Annie suggests to the audience how to write with a pencil in his arms firmly to perfect the letters and capitalization.

"He was diligent and conscientious student who is really striving for perfection," said Professor Laura Erb. "He was very determined to do well, as he has done all kinds of writing, I wanted to make sure that is clear and concise and very proud of his work .."
Erb said Annie sometimes have to endure to give their influence on lined paper, but always keep in the classroom with his friends. In fact, tutors other students.

"I do not consider it a special education [Student], he's just Annie," said Erb. "He takes things very quickly kept pace with the class and curriculum .."
Despite its flaws, Annie can use scissors and glue in the classroom, Erb said, and have learned to dressing, feeding, swimming and bicycling. He also excelled in mathematics.

"It has become a very natural thing for him. He just wrote exactly. He does not have a therapy," said Erb.
Now in its 21st year, Zaner-Bloser National Competition Handwriting is an annual event for primary school students that promotes handwriting. This year's competition includes a new category for students with disabilities after Nicholas Maxim, a fifth grade student from Maine who was born without hands or forearms, applied to the general jurisdiction of last year and impressed the judges with their writing skills hand.

Students can submit the manuscript in cursive, or to enter. Annie won a screenwriting contest. In your application form for class 1.2, wrote a sentence that is needed: "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog."

Responding to a question, "What do you like writing?" Carefully decorated with "i" and wrote: "Writing is fun and special"
More than 2.5 million students have participated in the competition for years, according to company estimates.
Annie's parents, Tom and Mary Ellen Clark, have three biological children and six adopted children from China, including Annie, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Annie came to western Pennsylvania, at age 2.

"He was kind and sweet and loving, and has contributed much to our family," said his mother Mary Ellen Clark. "We all just love it and can not imagine life without him."
Described as shy, Annie was surprised to learn of the assembly who had won the prize since his mother asked him not to tell first.

"He was to receive the trophy and I know he is overwhelmed, but he is ready," said Mary Ellen Clark. "Then I'll say it started to sink and saw his smile and know he is enjoying the moment."

"He was surprised," said Annie's sister Amy, 25. "When that happens, your eyes were so big."
Annie relatives, classmates, teachers and families could not be happier for him. Determined to stop here seven years. He has big dreams of becoming a writer, according to his teacher.

"He has a real sense of confidence," the mother, Mary Ellen Clark said. "He was just proud of being and as a parent, I'm happy with it."